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Ensuring transparency and accountability in government to counter fraud and corruption

Ensuring transparency and accountability in government to counter fraud and corruption

In this article, Elizabeth Tydd, Chief Executive Officer & Information Commissioner, Information and Privacy Commission (IPC) (NSW) shares the steps government agencies can take to build a culture of openness to drive transparency and how this can ultimately improve fraud prevention and detection in the long-run.
A checklist to effective fraud detection and prevention in government

A checklist to effective fraud detection and prevention in government

Featuring insights from five thought leaders across the Australian public sector, this checklist outlines 10 core areas government organisations should focus on to ensure proactive fraud and corruption management.
Tips from the Australian Federal Police (AFP) on how to prevent and detect fraud

Tips from the Australian Federal Police (AFP) on how to prevent and detect fraud

In this article, Commander Peter Crozier Manager, Criminal Assets, Fraud & Anti-Corruption, Organised Crime & Cyber at AFP, explores how they are taking a multi-agency approach to fraud detection and lessons that other government organisations can learn from their experiences in order to develop a robust fraud prevention and detection plan.
Creating strong internal controls to prevent fraud in public organisations: Insights with TfNSW

Creating strong internal controls to prevent fraud in public organisations: Insights with TfNSW

Many public organisations operate in business-critical environments, with responsibilities to provide multiple services at the same time and on a daily basis. Internal controls have a key role in fraud prevention strategies, but how can public organisations establish effective mechanisms and ensure they remain effective over the long term? Phil Thomas, Director Audit & Risk (Chief Audit Executive, Chief Risk Officer) at Transport for NSW (TfNSW), shares insight into how the organisation manages fraud through a series of internal controls based on the Three Lines of Defence model.
How to build a principles-based approach to prevent fraud and corruption at the source

How to build a principles-based approach to prevent fraud and corruption at the source

Fraud and corruption prevention can be a complex undertaking for public organisations, not merely because of the amount of risks or competing business priorities at play – but an instituted, compliance-based mentality that impacts prevention capability. In this article, Andrew Lawrence, Senior Legal Officer, Fraud, Security and Integrity Reform – Attorney-General’s Department, shares exclusive insight into how public organisations can address key criteria to build a principles-based approach to become more adaptive and proactive in preventing fraud and corruption.
Creating an effective risk prioritisation framework at the ATO

Creating an effective risk prioritisation framework at the ATO

The demand for risk management capabilities continues to grow in the Australian public sector. Set against a backdrop of fiscal constraint and departmental restructuring, government organisations are reassessing their risk management strategies to achieve increased levels of productivity across their operating environments, as well as prevent any potential threats to the business. For the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), achieving operational efficiency has meant a greater focus on prioritising risk at a corporate level.